Making Money with Online Video

Our most recent Webcast was broadcast live from the offices of the Interactive Advertising Bureau, a partner on the Naked Media WebTV series.

The main topic was making money with online video. We brought in Dina Kaplan from Blip.TV and Steve Rosenbaum from Magnify to discuss how.

Our most recent Webcast was broadcast live from the offices of the Interactive Advertising Bureau, a partner on the Naked Media WebTV series. Show host Dorian Benkoil sat down with IAB president and CEO Randall Rothenberg, Magnify.net CEO Steve Rosenbaum and Blip.TV co-founder and COO Dina Kaplan.

The show was our first from the IAB offices as part of our new partnership with the organization. We first sat down with IAB president and CEO Randall Rothenberg to get his take on why “advertising is creepy,” as the IAB says in its new campaign to fend off privacy legislation, and talked about other industry trends and news.

Then we were joined by the founder and head of video platform Magnify.net, Steve Rosenbaum, and Dina Kaplan, co-founder of Blip.TV. We talked about what is and isn’t working in video, about trends in curation and aggregation, details of sponsorship and revenue, and, of course audience questions.

Plus, as always, Dorian’s “Shallow Thoughts” on the media.

About the Guests

Randall Rothenberg, is president and CEO of the IAB, which
represents more than 300 leading interactive companies responsible for
selling over 86 percent of online advertising in the U.S. Randall is author of his influential blog “I, A Bee” and the noted book Where the Suckers Moon: An Advertising Story, was a senior director at the Booz Allen Hamilton consulting firm, and spent six years as a journalist and editor at The New York Times. He is frequently quoted in the media, books and scholarly publications, and is a noted speaker and advocate for the industry.

Steven Rosenbaum, is CEO and co-founder of Magnify.net, a video publishing platform that allows Web sites, media companies, and content entrepreneurs to aggregate and curate Web video from a wide variety of Web sources. Rosenbaum is a serial entrepreneur, Emmy Award winning documentary filmmaker, and innovator in the field of user-generated media production. He calls his MTV Series “UNfiltered” the first successful U.S. commercial use of User Generated Video (UGV) in mass media.

Dina Kaplan, is co-founder of blip.tv, an online television network focused on featuring, promoting and monetizing “the best original shows on the Web,” which blip does via the Web, iTunes, and to the TV set through partnerships with FiOS, TiVo, Sony Television, Boxee and roku. Dina, as COO, oversees operations and business development for the company and is also the founder and chair of the New York Founders Club, a group dedicated to promoting the start-up community in New York City.

All You Need is Funds

Shallow thoughts for the most recent episode of Naked Media, which featured Randall Rothenberg, President of the IAB, Dina Kaplan, co-founder of Blip.TV, and Steven Rosenbaum, CEO of Magnify.net.

Shallow thoughts for the most recent episode of Naked Media, which featured Randall Rothenberg, President of the IAB, Dina Kaplan, co-founder of Blip.TV, and Steven Rosenbaum, CEO of Magnify.net.

You can watch all past episodes of Naked Media here.

Join the mailing list if you want to know when the next live webcast is scheduled.

Lyrics: Dorian Benkoil

Nothing you can Search that Can’t be Searched
Image: google/Murdoch

Nothing you can merge that can’t be merged
Image: NBC/Comcast

Nothing you can play
But you can watch Mac on your TV

It’s easy

Nothing to acquire can’t be acquired
Image: Craigslist and Ebay

No one you can hire that can’t be hired
Image: Saul Hansell from NYTimes

Nothing you can do, but you can learn how to make it pay
Image: AOL logos

It’s easy

All you need is funds
All you need is funds
All you need is funds, funds
Funds are all you need

The Future of Media

Our most recent episode of Naked Media was a great one, covering a biiiiig topic to kick off the Economist Media Convergence Conference.

Our most recent episode of Naked Media was a great one, covering a biiiiig topic to kick off the Economist’s Media Convergence Conference. Dorian moderated a panel featuring the founder of Craigslist, and top executives of Sony Music, Discovery Communications, and a new Financial Times search engine called Newssift.

The topic? “The Future of Media.” The discussion was packed with as much information as we could cram into an hour.

In addition to Craig Newmark, the guests are Mark Hollinger, Chief Operating Officer, Discovery Communications; Thomas Hesse, President, Global Digital Business, US Sales and Corporate Strategy, Sony Music Entertainment and Robin Johnson, Chief Executive Officer, FT Search Inc. Newssift.com (a new semantic search engine for business from the Financial Times company).

Gawker Open Forums

Nick Denton just revealed that he’s going to allow people to tag their comments on his Gawker websites, so related comments will be sifted and sorted together.

Nick Denton just revealed that he’s going to allow people to tag their comments on his Gawker websites, so related comments will be sifted and sorted together.

Let’s say you want to say something about Vogue magazine editor Anna Wintour. You simply write it, tag it with a little HASHTAG (that’s a pound sign for you uninitiated) and her name, and voila, everything you and everyone else writes with that tag goes onto the Anna Wintour page on the site — presumably with all the stuff the Web site’s editors have written about her, as well. All on one page for all the world to see.

Denton says he doesn’t know what will happen with the new system and that he expects “anarchy.” But he did tell the Nieman Labs website that he kind of hopes it becomes a dark Facebook, where “your friends and your enemies fight over” what it says on your “wall.” It presumably could work with companies, brand names, and, really, any category of stuff. People could tag anything that makes their stomach roll with “HASHTAGquesy” or devilishly mark an entry about Coke with a Pepsi hashtag.

As usual, Nick Denton is being an evil genius. He’s brilliant in the way he threads the needle between editorial control and letting the crowd speak. And he’s also appealing to our base nature, and begging us to have at it with each other — on his blogs, of course, so he gets the traffic and the benefits. He notes that even as the blog gets more professional — controlled editorially by editors — he wants the Gawker community to continue to contribute.

So, what’s worse: Being tagged on Gawker, or being left off? You decide.

Jason Calacanis’ Rant Against Apple

UPDATE: 1-on-1 video interview of Calacanis explaining his position and “cognitive dissonance” of touting Apple iPhone apps in the same presentation he slams Apple.

= = = =
I’m hoping there’ll be video, but for now, here’s the notes I quickly took on a rant by Jason Calacanis against Apple at the DigiDay: Apps conference in New York. (Twitter tag is #digiday.)

In a nutshell, if you don’t want to have to plow through all the below: He says Steve Jobs wants to control the network, devices and the desktop, that he is working against the four decades of work spent to build the open Web, and that application developers should say “stop, enough” stop building apps for iPhones that Apple can reject without reason or explanation. Stop them and demand openness. You should, he says, be able to get any app or platform you want on your iPhone, a device you paid for and for which you pay handsomely for andata access. (Some pointed out the inherent contradition in how Calacanis prefaced his remarks by talking first about how Mahalo, his current company, is developing an iPhone app, and recommended about 10 other such apps, from geo-location to find the nearest Starbucks without a line, to getting fake calls from celebrities to impress your friends.)

Now, his words, in rough notes typing as he talked:

Apple folks are “dictators, taste makers and control what we do … We shouldn’t allow that… if the poeple in this room, and others, say ‘enough, the platform shoudl be open. lf people want to load an application, they shoudl be able to go to starbucks.com, they should be able to go to the website and load it’… but because steve jobs builds beautful, oh, devices, they get away with it …. i’m a capitalist … people in china are geting paid nothing to make those phones, and all the profits are here. … however it’s now getting to the point where it’s anti-competitive, and it’s going to hurt the industry. AT&T is screwing you by not letting you do what you want with your data mix. However, we’re all schmucks becuase … if i told you when you bought your car you could only drive it a certain way at certain times on certain roads… you have google voice but you were not allowed to use, cannot attach to phone to laptop … on computer can put any browser you want. but on iPhone can’t…. iphone is “the greatest device ever made”… (kisses his iphone) … i love it, but just cuz i love it doesn’t mean that i am going to extend the evil empire from here onto my tablet (which apple is building — makes case software on tablet will be iphone, not open comptuer OS). and he’s only going to stop when he gets to your desktop. …..steve jobs is jesus, mohamed in our industry. however, we’re letting him get away frith murder. take all the progress in tech industry over 4 decades and reverse it. o’wise, ev’y time.. if you can order your lunch thru any web page, then why can’t you order throuh the browser on here (holds up iphone — because, he says, they have a patent on an ordering technology)? apple, steve jobs in collusion to shut down all 3 layers at 1ce. network shoudl be open and free, appl’n, device. … they’re slowing down the industry (by kicking people out of apps store)… ”

Answers to questions:
“Microsoft has gotten their ass kicked by the internet, so they’ve taken some steps to be more open. does that mean x-box? no. but otherwise more open source becuase they have to … google uses all open source tech’y … allow exporting of ev’g they do … they scary from standoint of how good they are … Google has no lockin (you can use Bing or Yahoo) with exception of privacy. hold our data for 18 months. we should have the right to remove it. apple and google behave better in Europe… in australia pick iphone, pick provider. … it’s heartbreaking to watch all the work and sweat of makign the internet open taken away by steve jobs) … closed is never as good as open. .. facebook, which is partly closed, and apple, will make us realize that.

Shallow Thoughts – Avner Ronen, CEO, Boxee

Avner Ronen was a recent guest on Naked Media and shared his vision of a future when creative content producers will produce films or episodic TV series inexpensively and generate revenue through advertising and pay-per-view.

Avner Ronen was a recent guest on Naked Media. At the end of the show we asked Avner, in our Shallow Thoughts segment, what has been on his mind recently and why he is excited about the future of media.

The Boxee CEO shared his vision of a future in which creative content producers will produce films or episodic TV series inexpensively and generate revenue through advertising and pay-per-view.

Public Radio’s iPhone App and Demographics

Rafat Ali, on PaidContent, points out that the new iPhone app to listen to public radio could be a game changer, transforming the model of local public radio listening to a more national, a la carte one.

Rafat Ali, on PaidContent, points out that the new iPhone app to listen to public radio could be a game changer, transforming the model of local public radio listening to a more national, a la carte one. There’s also some back and forth about whether the app — which will eventually allow contributions from the phone, and may be available on other phones, too — will hurt radio stations by removing local loyalties, or help by encouraging more contributions.

I see another issue: will the new app cause a split in the public radio audience, between the have-mores and have-lesses? As I wrote in a comment:

Those who use smartphones will tend to be of a higher socioeconomic status, and probably be younger, than those who listen only over the air. Phone listeners will get a richer, more diverse set of programming, and at some point may be more highly valued than those who listen only over the air. It’s analogous to cable vs. broadcast, and how the broadcast-only audience is less valued, commercially, per viewer.

Public radio may find some dissonance between its mission to serve all and its desire to target higher revenues. The public radio listener demo tends to be a higher educated and desirable economic group than radio listeners overall, but what happens if that public radio group gets split into the have mores and the have-lesses?

Rafat will soon be a guest on our show, Naked Media, likely the end of August or beginning of September. We can ask him all about it all, then.

Twitter as the New Nielsen

Dave Morgan, CEO of Simulmedia, and former CEO of Tacoda, which was sold to AOL for about $250 million, recently caused a stir with an article he wrote in MediaPost titled, Could Twitter Replace Nielsen.

In the article, Dave wonders whether, at some point, Twitter may prove to be an as or more effective, and certainly cheaper, way to measure audiences than Nielsen and other similar services.

His team is currently poking around at Twitter data to see what sense they can make of it. An example can be seen at Fred Wilson’s A VC blog.

Naked Media host Dorian Benkoil had a chance to catch up with Dave, along with John Burbank, CEO of Nielsen at the Advertising Research Foundation Audience Measurement conference, which we produced in NYC last month.

Boxee as The (anti-TiVO) Solution

It looks to me like Boxee aims to be THE media consumption solution on whatever box you use — computer, set-top box, Apple TV, etc. Steve Rosenbaum, CEO of video aggregator Magnify.net, on Monday wrote a provocative piece saying Boxee could “be the new operating system for the open content web.”

But he also implores Boxee to take the initiative on the business front, make money and avoid the TiVO fate he lamented: taking investment money from a big TV network that he feels made TiVO change its model and soften its mission the disruptor of standard TV.

We’ve gotten great questions for Avner Ronen and Betsy Morgan, from Steve and others, and will use them to inform our discussion at noon ET today with Boxee CEO Avner Ronen and HuffPost’s former CEO Betsy Morgan.

Others Rise, Economist Falls – Except in Revenue

Picture 2

Today on Naked Media, guests Roger Black and Rich Antoniello found it surprising when I cited figures that showed the Economist’s Web traffic fell from 2007 to 2008 (even as the magazine, and the company’s revenues grew). The Economist’s Web traffic is down, but as a business it does better. The other news mags gain Web traffic, but their businesses do worse. Not sure what conclusions to reach: Perhaps there isn’t one and the fact the mag is doing better is divorced from the website’s performance.

But here’s the link to the Pew project where I got my info.