Using Employee Perspectives to Improve Consumer Engagement

Susan Jurevics, Sr. Director of Marketing at Sony on turning employees into brand evangelists.

The above video interview is from Internet Week in NYC.

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We hear a great deal about the need to break down our corporate silos as essential to achieve brand success in the socially connected world. Susan Jurevics, Senior Director of Marketing at Sony, describes going one step deeper — acknowledging employees as proxies for consumers and guiding them into service as brand advocates.

The way that media is now consumed makes it difficult to reach consumers through traditional print advertising. Employee engagement is informing Sony’s move from traditional, 12-week campaign structure to “always on” marketing with consumer conversations and co-creation.

Jurevics, who runs brand marketing for Sony in North America, speaks about conducting deep research with employees — formal quantitive and qualitative studies, ethnographies and home visits to explore how they are consuming media.

When Sony launched its Make. Believe branding, it sensed that if its own employees could not go beyond simple understanding of the message, it could not successfully get it out to consumers. Employees were given language they could use on their Facebook pages, LinkedIn profiles and other social identities.

The company also conducted a contest asking employees to put their Make. Believe moment into 150 words. The winning entrants had their stories about how Sony helped their dreams become reality filmed and streamed at CES.

Consumers are starting to understand the concept behind Make. Believe. Putting employees and consumers in the same, virtual environment, Sony is inviting consumers to join collaborate with the company in the development of short-form videos and narrations to create a steady stream of talk around the theme.

Change if this kind, Jurevics acknowledges, takes time to get through her big, global, diverse and heavily matrixed company. Initiatives that pull employee activities through to the consumer may just be the means to make Sony a bit smaller and simpler.

Pumping Up Web Image Interactivity

Interview with Chas Edwards, CRO of Pixazza

The above video interview is from Internet Week in NYC.

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An increasing amount of content is being built around photos to enhance stories and increase engagement. Pixazza has looked through the eyes of consumers viewing your images and see they want more than just a limited, static experience.

Knowing that publishers can’t just slap a rich media ad on top of images, the company presents a way to attach relevant content that’s revealed when the image is moused over. On celebrity entertainment sites, for example, consumers may want to know more about what a favorite celebrity is wearing and Pixazza will surface information on where the attire can be purchased.

How much of an opportunity does this create for brand advertisers? Chas Edwards, CRO of Pixazza, states that 20% of those presented with interactive images engage with that additional content. He reports 100 million daily interactions by 150 million monthly uniques, with 100 publishers signing up daily for Pixazza.
social media, photo sharing, facebook, fans, API, twitter, images, ecommerce, shopping
Under the hood, Pixazza uses machine image recognition algorithms supplemented by a freelance team to identify objects inside of images for connection to relevant content.

When asked in the second half of the interview for tips for startups, Edwards advises them to play in as big a sandbox as they can find. No matter what, he warned, once they start taking their idea to customers, publishers and brand advertisers, they’ll be pressed to make changes.

On the hiring front, Edwards states he seeks people who offer more than a single expertise, who can evolve with the company. Perhaps someone is developing Pixazza for HR that reveals more about candidates than initially meets the eye.

How Companies Win

The Way Your Company Won in the Past is Very Different than the Way it Will Win in the Future


The above video is from the Advertising Research Foundation annual conference. Register now for Audience Measurement 6.0 on June 13 – 14 in NYC.                               
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Charlie Sheen knows how to win. Does your company? How do you get a little of the tiger blood, ordinance dropping f-18 mojo pumping through the corporate culture?

The Way Your Company Won in the Past is Very Different than the Way it Will Win in the Future argue David Calhoun – CEO, The Nielsen Company and Rick Kash – Chairman, The Cambridge Group.

The events of the past few years go well beyond the financial realities of a recession. The growth in emerging markets, the revolution in social media, and the changing consumer all combine to define a new economy. How companies will win in the future is going to be very different than how they’ve won in the past.

  • The U.S. and the rest of the developed world will face a business economy driven by three critical factors:
  • Global oversupply in virtually all manufacturing sectors
  • Flat to contracting demand for the next three to five years in the developed world
  • A systemic change in how consumer demand will be formed, communicated, aggregated and satisfied

Dave Calhoun, CEO of Nielsen, and Rick Kash, the Chairman of The Cambridge Group, authors of How Companies Win, create a call to action as they outline the new business model for how companies will win today and tomorrow.

They also define the new leadership role for marketing research and marketing as companies transform and adapt to the realities of the new demand economy and the primacy of demand.

Getting to Powerfully Creative Ads Through Creative Business Strategies

Chuck Porter – Chairman, Crispin Porter + Bogusky shows us how.


The above video is from the Advertising Research Foundation annual conference. Register now for Audience Measurement 6.0 on June 13 – 14 in NYC.                               
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Chuck Porter – Chairman, Crispin Porter + Bogusky spoke at the Advertising Research Foundation annual conference. Gain insights into the world-class process that Crispin Porter + Bogusky uses to get to their unique record of consistently successful campaigns.

Why is CP+B’s investment in understanding cultural connections differentiating? What is the process and role of research that gets CP+B to creative business strategies and solutions? Chuck Porter, chairman of CP+B, also discusses how his teams get to ads that are as powerfully “creative” as the business strategy.

The Power of Great Creative Ideas

Cultural anthropologist Grant McCracken talks about how great creative ideas draw meaning from culture and then give it back again.


The above video is from the Advertising Research Foundation annual conference. Register now for Audience Measurement 6.0 on June 13 – 14 in NYC.                               
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This session from the Advertising Research Foundation annual conference celebrates the unequaled power of creative ideas to grow businesses. With today’s focus often placed on things like media choices and interactivity, the creative side of things gets overlooked, often to the advertisers’ peril. Cultural anthropologist, Grant McCracken, opens the session discussing his view that today’s great creative ideas are brilliant acts of meaning manufacture that draw meaning from culture and then give it back again. The session concludes with a panel of CMO’s sharing their thoughts on the presentations.

Speakers

  • Grant McCracken – Author of Chief Culture Officer
  • Kim Feil – VP & CMO, Walgreens
  • Christa Carone – VP & CMO, The Xerox Corporation
  • Michele Buck – SVP & Global CMO, The Hershey Company

Social Influence Trumps Individual Choice

Insights from anthropology, primatology, network and other behavioral sciences suggest that our behavior is much more socially- than individually-shaped.


The above video is from the Advertising Research Foundation annual conference. Register now for Audience Measurement 6.0 on June 13 – 14 in NYC.                               
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Despite the noise around Facebook and Social Media, many of us have yet to get to grips with the bigger and more challenging insights from anthropology, primatology, network and other behavioral sciences which suggest that our behavior is much more socially- than individually-shaped.

This session from the Advertising Research Foundation annual conference explores how social our behavior really is and how the mechanisms behind social influence really work.

Presented by:
Mark Earls – Consultant, HERD Consulting
John Kearon – Chief Juicer and Founder, BrainJuicer

Advertising Research Must Change

Innovative strategies that agencies and clients need to embrace in the next decade include…


The above video is from the Advertising Research Foundation annual conference. Register now for Audience Measurement 6.0 on June 13 – 14 in NYC.                               
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Recently, the research industry has focused mainly on data and research quality. But many agree that the pace of change is not fast enough. This presentation argues the case for change and outlines possible innovative strategies that agencies and clients need to embrace in the next decade. In the follow-up discussion, a distinguished panel shares their points of view about what the research industry must do to help advertisers manage the complexity ahead.

Speakers

  • Stan Sthanunathan – VP, Marketing Strategy & Insights, The Coca-Cola Company
  • Joe Tripodi – EVP & Chief Marketing & Commercial Officer, The Coca-Cola Company
  • Eric Salama – Chairman and CEO, Kantar
  • Joan Lewis – Officer, Global Consumer & Market Knowledge, The Procter & Gamble Company
  • Kevin Lane Keller – Professor of Marketing, Tuck School of Business, Dartmouth College

Self-Regulation in Online Advertising

Do Not Track is a loose concept in DC – with very little consensus on what “tracking” even means

The above video interview is from the IAB Annual Conference.                               
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When I did this interview back in February, the IAB had just announced its Code of Conduct for its members and set its deadline for compliance. Now we’re three months closer to August 29, the date by which IAB members have to abide by the Code (and, in doing so, comply with the Digital Advertising Alliance’s (DAA) Self-Regulatory Program for Online Behavioral Advertising), or risk being kicked out of the IAB (for new applicants, compliance is a prerequisite).

Are businesses paying attention to the privacy alarm? Many surely are—we’re seeing proof of “first wave” adoption ourselves, with over 80 major brands and 20 leading networks/DSP’s using Evidon InForm to demonstrate evidence of compliance with the DAA’s Program. And the pressure is obviously coming from more than just the IAB. DAA enforcement is under way, and no one is interested in popping up on the radar screens of the BBB and the DMA.

While there is a lot of noise coming from Capitol Hill—from the bi-partisan “Privacy Bill of Rights” drafted by senators Kerry and McCain, to Senator Rockefeller’s “Do-Not-Track Online Act of 2011”—it is key that companies not sit on their hands to wait out how things play out on the Hill. The FTC isn’t sitting still waiting for new laws from Congress. Companies large and small have been forced into decades-long settlements with the FTC.

The only requirement for any member of the ANA, AAF, DMA, IAB or 4A’s is compliance with the DAA program. If anything, the increasing noise level in the market makes immediate adoption of the DAA Program even more logical.

Why? Because the Program is real—it’s the one concrete mechanism that companies can use NOW to provide consumers with meaningful transparency into and control over how their information is used online. Waiting around to “see how things play out on the Hill” exposes your company to risk and will not have any positive impact on the legislative process.

Do Not Track is a loose concept in DC – with very little consensus on what “tracking” even means – and very much beta functionality from the major browser makers, each with its own host of problems. The “tracking protection list” (TPL) concept, or whitelisting, is a prime example. If you’re a consumer, which would you prefer – a contextual notice experience that lets you make an informed decision about who should or shouldn’t be allowed to use your information online, or a blunt decision made for you by another company that dictates which companies are good and which are bad? This is about consumers making an educated choice.

Proposed bills include some interesting ideas, but they’re still only proposed bills. We’ll see what develops out of DC over the next months, and we’re encouraged that some legislators are determined to find a healthy balance between empowering consumers and keeping business strong. But waiting can’t be an option, and it shouldn’t be, considering that there are tools at our disposal now.

So the onus is, as always, on the companies who deliver billions of ads to consumers every day. Use the tools you have—get with the Self-Regulatory Program and educate consumers in a meaningful way. The more people see that icon, and understand what information is being collected and how it’s being used, the more comfortable they become with businesses using their data responsibly. We’ve been given multiple indications from both the FTC and Congress that if we can deliver that sort of transparency and control to consumers through the Program, they’ll find it unnecessary to create more prohibitive regulations around OBA. Then you can get back to focusing on growing your business.

The Platform Wars

Google, Facebook, Apple, Amazon, and Microsoft wage war. What it means for Advertisers.

The above video is from the Advertising Research Foundation annual conference. Register now for Audience Measurement 6.0 on June 13 – 14 in NYC.                               
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Timothy Wu, noted Internet expert and author of The Master Switch, believes that the Internet is slowly moving into an age of greater consolidation, following the footsteps of the radio, film and other information industries before it.

The current stage is characterized by serious tension between four or five platforms – Google, Facebook, Apple, Amazon, Microsoft – striving for dominance.

What business models – open or closed – will have the upper hand? Will platforms based-on per unit sales or advertising-based models triumph? And what does it all mean for advertisers?

Presented by Timothy Wu, Professor of Law, Columbia University and Author of Master Switch: The Rise and Fall of Information Empires

Cause Marketing Case Study

Cause marketing is a collaboration between a brand, a non-profit and interested individuals.


The above video interview is from the ANA Brand Conference in NYC.                               
Sponsored by
brands, webtv, webisodic series, content marketing, consumers, eyeballs, display advertising, ana, association of national advertisers, iab, 4as

Cause marketing has come of age. What was once considered a strategy that would be nice to do has become an integral part of the engagement between brands and their consumers. Non-profit organizations have become savvy in the ways of cause marketing and are ready to talk with brands about potential partnerships every day. As for consumers, they now assume that the brands they buy are also adding something good to the world.

In its simplest forms, cause marketing is a collaboration between a brand, a non-profit and interested individuals. The collaboration results in new awareness for the cause as well as donations and consumer engagement in the cause. The brand gains recognition for giving back and the consumer feels good about being able to do something good. The real winner is the community at large which is the ultimate beneficiary from cause programs.

Mike Swenson is President of Barkley PR/Cause and in the above video he talks more about cause and specifically the work Barkley is doing with Sonic Drive-In and their Limeades for Learning cause program.