ChatThreads Reveals Results of Live Tracking Study

Walter Carl reveals results from ChatThreads’ live tracking studies related to social media.


The above video interview is from the Advertising Research Foundation Audience Measurement conference.

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An important question at this year’s ARF conference was, “does social media have an impact on sales?” Walter Carl, the founder and CRO of ChatThreads, talked about his company’s findings.

People who are FaceBook ‘fans’ of a brand will spend more but only if they were passionate about the product in the first place. Carl also talked about the importance of the combination effect of TV/Billboard and Social Media advertising. They found that the combination effect accounted for a 17% lift in effectiveness.

ChatThreads uses live tracking to observe advertising effects on test subjects. Live tracking makes it possible to see a 360 degree view of the subjects’ exposure to advertising.

ChatThreads ran a study where subjects used a mobile app to track their exposure to quick service restaurant brands by taking a picture or making a note, and also writing down if it was a positive or negative experience. This included ads on TV and billboards, as well as mentions of a brand through a friend’s FaceBook or Twitter updates. This allowed ChatThreads to gather data on the relationship between a person’s real world and social media interactions with a brand.

For more of Walter Carl and ChatThreads’ findings, see the above video.

The Power of Persuasion and Watchability in TV Ads

Is TV ad engagement better when consumers are highly engaged in the program in which the ads are placed? Maybe so, maybe no.


The above video interview is from the Advertising Research Foundation Audience Measurement conference.

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There is a school of thought that ad effectiveness increases when TV viewers are more highly engaged in the programming they watch. According to data collected by Ace Metrix, however, there is a low correlation between the two, with ad creativity the essential variable in ad engagement.

CEO Peter Daboll says the findings conclude that viewing intensity, loyalty to the particular TV program and multiple other program engagement attributes do not affect how ads are processed. Relevance and purchase intent are core, with watchability and persuasion contributed by ads’ creativity leading to effectiveness. Daboll, citing his bias towards creative, suggests implications for online and social TV, along with over-the-air.

To be persuasive, an ad needs to hold viewers’ attention and have content that is valuable and relevant. Illustrating another strategic tact, Daboll observes that many successful beer ads benefit from broad appeal by testing to be sure they don’t offend viewers not specifically targeted. He also cautions that an eruption of negative comments on social media does not necessarily mean that an ad is ineffective — public relations and advertising effectiveness issues are to be addressed separately.

Monetizing and Measuring Mobile Video

‘If you can’t measure it, you can’t monetize it,’ says Steve Lanzano of TVB about mobile video.


The above video interview is from the Advertising Research Foundation Audience Measurement conference.

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advertising research, brands, webtv, webisodic series, online video, consumers, eyeballs, display advertising, ana, association of national advertisers, iab, 4as

“If you can’t measure it, you can’t monetize it,” said Steve Lanzano of TVB, about the hesitance of companies when it comes to mobile video.

Advertising agencies, TV Networks, and brand advertisers generally do not care what kind of device the consumer watches on, as long as they can measure and monetize the audience. Currently, there is no measurement for mobile viewing that can equate to the rating system that networks and advertisers use for TV.

According to Lanzano, brand advertisers are no longer trying to reach and sell to demographics but to biographics. Through the evolution of measuring technology and research, companies are moving away from looking for consumers in categories such as ‘adult, male, 18-24,’ and towards looking for consumers with either very specific needs, or who are in the market for what the advertiser is selling.

Engaged with Media as Long as Their Eyes are Open

ESPN programs across all five major media delivery systems — TV, radio, Internet, mobile and print.


The above video interview is from the Advertising Research Foundation Audience Measurement conference.

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advertising research, brands, webtv, webisodic series, online video, consumers, eyeballs, display advertising, ana, association of national advertisers, iab, 4as

New platform choices appear to be adding more hours to the media day of a segment of consumers. While different patterns of consumption can been found across the media types as they are selected based on access, time-of-day and location, ESPN finds its core audience of male sports fans is spending more time with the brand.

ESPN’s VP of Integrated Media Research, Glenn Enoch, notes that 15 years ago viewers could watch his channel’s content only on TV. Now, it’s available on TV, radio, Internet, mobile and print. The result is not cannibalization. Rather, ESPN’s research finds that consumers with improved “best screen” choices are engaged — one way or another — more hours per day.

Publishers need to consider multiple contexts for their media platform initiatives. For example, finding significant percentages of Internet and mobile engagement at work is not surprising. Perhaps less obvious, Enoch observes, is that radio, along with being widely used in cars, is also used by consumers of ESPN content at work when other choices are not available.

This should serve as encouragement for publishers with strong brands to be certain to be on the platforms used by their consumers, tailored to the locations and times-of-day those platforms are most likely to be a preferred choice.

Proctor & Gamble’s Focus on Education

Find out how P&G is focused on education, communities, and making quicker decisions.


The above video interview is from the Advertising Research Foundation Audience Measurement conference.

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advertising research, brands, webtv, webisodic series, online video, consumers, eyeballs, display advertising, ana, association of national advertisers, iab, 4as

For many of Proctor and Gamble’s products, the purpose of an Internet presence is not to directly sell something but to build brand loyalty.

According to Joan Lewis, the Consumer and Market Knowledge Officer for Proctor and Gamble, the brand is aware of this and, as a solution, is working with existing online communities and building new communities to reach a wider audience.

Lewis also addressed the importance of knowing when to focus on building a community on FaceBook and when to take those people to the brand’s own website to build a subcommunity. She used Pampers as an example for that.

Lewis talked about the key marketing and research initiatives her team at P&G is working on. The first is making quicker decisions on campaigns. There are two factors involved here. The first is for P&G to gather enough real-time data, and the second is to simplify internal communications so that reactions to the real-time data can be processed faster. This research initiative applied to P&G’s campaigns for the Olympics in Vancouver, which Lewis highlights in the video.

P&G is also focused on creating a strong association between education and P&G’s products. Some examples of this include building a community of parents for the Pampers website and hosting live chats with experts where community members can ask health or behavioral questions.

Some other clever P&G campaigns include:
Charmin’s Sit or Squat App
Always’ App for women
-Being a Girl’s World’s Biggest Sleepover

Segmenting the Audience is So Yesterday

Duane Varan of the Disney Media & Advertising Lab, on the impact of 3D TV on viewers, and new media research paradigms.


The above video interview is from the Advertising Research Foundation Audience Measurement conference.

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advertising research, brands, webtv, webisodic series, online video, consumers, eyeballs, display advertising, ana, association of national advertisers, iab, 4as

If new ad models are to have a research focus, the way the industry conducts its research should reflect that rapid change is now the status quo. Dr. Duane Varan speaks of past ad industry research practices as based on analytical observations categorizing what is happening in the world. He sees us moving to a method based on understanding variables by manipulating them and assessing the results.

Varan is chief research officer and executive director of the Disney Media & Advertising Lab, a role he holds concurrently with his academic appointment as professor and executive director of the Audience Research Labs at Murdoch University. “When tomorrow looks like yesterday, that favors certain research methods,” he says. “But, when tomorrow looks nothing like yesterday, the question is what research tools do we need to help guide us into uncharted terrain.”

In the past, analytics and focus groups worked because we had benchmarks to allow them to serve as proxies for what we were measuring in order to derive insights. In an era of perpetual and rapid change, that model breaks down.

Now, we are able to harness single source data from actual behavior. In addition, notes Varan, with people in a constant pattern of change, the idea of segmenting the audience is, “Really yesterday.” Instead of talking about audience segments, we have to understand the variables that shape the behavior of people who live in multiple audience segments, jumping among them during the course of the day. Based on recent activities, he sees major breakthroughs in the isolation, definition and contextual understanding of variables such as emotional layers.

Varan also presents findings from an extensive study of 3D television using ESPN World Cup coverage. Examining everything from potential impact to health effects, these studies indicate that 3D sports content is more engaging, more enjoyable and that viewers have a greater sense of presence. (And those studies did not appear to suffer ill effects.) 3D ad studies are limited by lack of inventory, but first indications are that 3D ads are more positive than 2D versions across recall, retention, purchase intention, brand attitude and other metrics.

Exploring Pros and Cons of Behavioral Metrics

This new breed of metrics includes click-throughs on web pages, search lifts, and site visitation.


The above video interview is from the Advertising Research Foundation Audience Measurement conference.

Sponsored by

advertising research, brands, webtv, webisodic series, online video, consumers, eyeballs, display advertising, ana, association of national advertisers, iab, 4as

Sebastian Fernandez, Senior Manager of Ad Effectiveness at Yahoo!, spoke to us about behavioral metics at the Audience Measurement Conference. This new breed of metrics includes click-throughs on web pages, search lifts, and site visitation.

The nice thing about behavioral metrics is that they are seamlessly gathered from user behavior–instead of a self-reported survey. Surveys are disruptive to the user experience and can negatively effect the results.

Although behavioral metrics are great for some cases, they do come with their problems. For instance, one of the important questions surrounding these metrics is whether can they be compared to traditional metrics? Although people want to believe in the effectiveness of these measurements, others are not convinced and say that it’s like comparing apples to oranges.

Fernandez reminded us that although behavioral metrics pointed out some important correlations between ad exposure and internet searches, they cannot be used to judge everything. The research continues for a better understanding of what behavioral metrics measure and how much to trust them.

Advertising on the Best Available Screen

Consumers frequently seek video programming based on platform convenience. What this means to programmers and advertisers…


The above video interview is from the Advertising Research Foundation Audience Measurement conference.

Sponsored by

advertising research, brands, webtv, webisodic series, online video, consumers, eyeballs, display advertising, ana, association of national advertisers, iab, 4as

When a viewer chooses a platform to consume video, the decision is increasingly influenced by convenience — location, available time, discovery style, etc. It’s important to know these consumer content choices in a platform agnostic way, as aggregate data no longer reflects behaviors and attitudes.

Joan FitzGerald, VP of Television Sales and Business Development at comScore, observes that 20 years ago the creative for mass media advertising could have happened in vacuum and still have impact. Because lifestyles are changing, consumers are now able to make choices that obligate advertisers to pay closer attention to all dimensions of their tastes and behaviors in order to successfully engage. Programers, too, she notes, need to attend more carefully to engagement to have consumers stay with programs through the ad breaks.

Cross platform measurement — including mobile — is important and available, notes FitzGerald. Addressable advertising, something she sees as a good opportunity for everyone, is more difficult to measure in the multiscreen world.

That consumers are unable to skip ads in online video does not appear to be a roadblock to the emerging platforms. FitzGerald cites research indicating viewership is not affected very much when ads are ramped up to levels approaching over-the-air TV.

Meeting the Cross-Platform Metrics Challenge

Jane Clarke, Coalition for Innovative Media Measurement, on the coalition’s quest to improve understanding of cross-platform media consumption.


The above video interview is from the Advertising Research Foundation Audience Measurement conference.

Sponsored by

advertising research, brands, webtv, webisodic series, online video, consumers, eyeballs, display advertising, ana, association of national advertisers, iab, 4as

More than a score of leading TV content providers, media agencies and large brand advertisers have formed a coalition to address the need for better measurement and understanding of the multi-platform, multi-screen media environment.

Jane Clarke, Managing Director of the Coalition for Innovative Media Measurement (CIMM), describes the process of framing the changing marketplace. First are planning tools to help efficiently get the right message to right people using the right media mix at the right time. Then come the campaign evaluation tools and assessment of ad effectiveness, including analysis of how cross-platform elements work together.

Among other activities, CIMM is currently conducting a proof of methodology initiative, called USA TouchPoints, that includes an iPhone app used by the sample to log activity, media consumption and mood every half hour. This data will be fused with that from existing media measurement services to create a more complete, consumer-centric audience analysis. If the tests are successful, the tool is projected to launch next year.

Arbitron’s Personal People Meter

Lung Huang of Arbitron talks about the Personal People Meter and the data it revealed.

The above video interview is from the Advertising Research Foundation Audience Measurement conference.

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advertising research, brands, webtv, webisodic series, online video, consumers, eyeballs, display advertising, ana, association of national advertisers, iab, 4as

Lung Wang of Arbitron was at the ARF Audience Measurement Conference to explain the role of the Personal People Meter (PPM) in their research and measurement.

The PPM is a device that ‘listens’ for PPM encoded radio and television programs, or anything with a sound channel. When worn around, the PPM can identify and measure all the ads and programs that a test subject was exposed to during the course of the day.

Like Microsoft’s Natasha Hrizuk, Huang spoke about the powerful effects of combining multiple mediums when running an ad campaign– in this case, when combing radio and television. The PPM is able to track the same person’s exposure to all ‘encoded’ audio throughout the day.

The more accurate a measurement is, the more confidently Arbitron can answer the question “what real value did I get from spending my money on ‘X’?’

Currently, Arbitron and CIMM are working together on gathering data from a panel of subjects that will measure exposure to TV, internet, and mobile advertising.

Looking into the future, Huang revealed that Arbitron is very interested in measuring and gathering data from podcast listeners.