Location is Not a Fad

Matt Gillian, cofounder of Simple Geo, discusses the increasingly important role of location-based services in apps.


The above video interview is from Internet Week in NYC.

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Location is more than just a check-in. Taking full advantage of location can change the way people interact with brands by moving the conversation to a physical location and, it’s hoped, a purchase.

The data that can be applied to applications’ geo-sensitive components runs deep. Matt Gillian, cofounder of Simple Geo, discusses how his company is striving to provide app developers with the data tools they seek to serve more precisely targeted information.

Putting consumers’ location and intentions into context can be aided by neighborhood data, such as demographics, population density and business with offers that may supplement the initial inquiry. Gillian describes promos that take consumers along the final mile, perhaps enhancing their experience with the augmented reality of virtual things in the real world displayed on the mobile device.

Brands and agencies hunger for technologies that provide data at every point in the consumer experience to achieve improved individualization and conversion. Location-based service layers feed that hunger and can do so while addressing the consumer appetite for discovery and convenience.

ChatThreads Reveals Results of Live Tracking Study

Walter Carl reveals results from ChatThreads’ live tracking studies related to social media.


The above video interview is from the Advertising Research Foundation Audience Measurement conference.

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An important question at this year’s ARF conference was, “does social media have an impact on sales?” Walter Carl, the founder and CRO of ChatThreads, talked about his company’s findings.

People who are FaceBook ‘fans’ of a brand will spend more but only if they were passionate about the product in the first place. Carl also talked about the importance of the combination effect of TV/Billboard and Social Media advertising. They found that the combination effect accounted for a 17% lift in effectiveness.

ChatThreads uses live tracking to observe advertising effects on test subjects. Live tracking makes it possible to see a 360 degree view of the subjects’ exposure to advertising.

ChatThreads ran a study where subjects used a mobile app to track their exposure to quick service restaurant brands by taking a picture or making a note, and also writing down if it was a positive or negative experience. This included ads on TV and billboards, as well as mentions of a brand through a friend’s FaceBook or Twitter updates. This allowed ChatThreads to gather data on the relationship between a person’s real world and social media interactions with a brand.

For more of Walter Carl and ChatThreads’ findings, see the above video.

Monetizing and Measuring Mobile Video

‘If you can’t measure it, you can’t monetize it,’ says Steve Lanzano of TVB about mobile video.


The above video interview is from the Advertising Research Foundation Audience Measurement conference.

Sponsored by

advertising research, brands, webtv, webisodic series, online video, consumers, eyeballs, display advertising, ana, association of national advertisers, iab, 4as

“If you can’t measure it, you can’t monetize it,” said Steve Lanzano of TVB, about the hesitance of companies when it comes to mobile video.

Advertising agencies, TV Networks, and brand advertisers generally do not care what kind of device the consumer watches on, as long as they can measure and monetize the audience. Currently, there is no measurement for mobile viewing that can equate to the rating system that networks and advertisers use for TV.

According to Lanzano, brand advertisers are no longer trying to reach and sell to demographics but to biographics. Through the evolution of measuring technology and research, companies are moving away from looking for consumers in categories such as ‘adult, male, 18-24,’ and towards looking for consumers with either very specific needs, or who are in the market for what the advertiser is selling.

Proctor & Gamble’s Focus on Education

Find out how P&G is focused on education, communities, and making quicker decisions.


The above video interview is from the Advertising Research Foundation Audience Measurement conference.

Sponsored by

advertising research, brands, webtv, webisodic series, online video, consumers, eyeballs, display advertising, ana, association of national advertisers, iab, 4as

For many of Proctor and Gamble’s products, the purpose of an Internet presence is not to directly sell something but to build brand loyalty.

According to Joan Lewis, the Consumer and Market Knowledge Officer for Proctor and Gamble, the brand is aware of this and, as a solution, is working with existing online communities and building new communities to reach a wider audience.

Lewis also addressed the importance of knowing when to focus on building a community on FaceBook and when to take those people to the brand’s own website to build a subcommunity. She used Pampers as an example for that.

Lewis talked about the key marketing and research initiatives her team at P&G is working on. The first is making quicker decisions on campaigns. There are two factors involved here. The first is for P&G to gather enough real-time data, and the second is to simplify internal communications so that reactions to the real-time data can be processed faster. This research initiative applied to P&G’s campaigns for the Olympics in Vancouver, which Lewis highlights in the video.

P&G is also focused on creating a strong association between education and P&G’s products. Some examples of this include building a community of parents for the Pampers website and hosting live chats with experts where community members can ask health or behavioral questions.

Some other clever P&G campaigns include:
Charmin’s Sit or Squat App
Always’ App for women
-Being a Girl’s World’s Biggest Sleepover

Exploring Pros and Cons of Behavioral Metrics

This new breed of metrics includes click-throughs on web pages, search lifts, and site visitation.


The above video interview is from the Advertising Research Foundation Audience Measurement conference.

Sponsored by

advertising research, brands, webtv, webisodic series, online video, consumers, eyeballs, display advertising, ana, association of national advertisers, iab, 4as

Sebastian Fernandez, Senior Manager of Ad Effectiveness at Yahoo!, spoke to us about behavioral metics at the Audience Measurement Conference. This new breed of metrics includes click-throughs on web pages, search lifts, and site visitation.

The nice thing about behavioral metrics is that they are seamlessly gathered from user behavior–instead of a self-reported survey. Surveys are disruptive to the user experience and can negatively effect the results.

Although behavioral metrics are great for some cases, they do come with their problems. For instance, one of the important questions surrounding these metrics is whether can they be compared to traditional metrics? Although people want to believe in the effectiveness of these measurements, others are not convinced and say that it’s like comparing apples to oranges.

Fernandez reminded us that although behavioral metrics pointed out some important correlations between ad exposure and internet searches, they cannot be used to judge everything. The research continues for a better understanding of what behavioral metrics measure and how much to trust them.

Arbitron’s Personal People Meter

Lung Huang of Arbitron talks about the Personal People Meter and the data it revealed.

The above video interview is from the Advertising Research Foundation Audience Measurement conference.

Sponsored by

advertising research, brands, webtv, webisodic series, online video, consumers, eyeballs, display advertising, ana, association of national advertisers, iab, 4as

Lung Wang of Arbitron was at the ARF Audience Measurement Conference to explain the role of the Personal People Meter (PPM) in their research and measurement.

The PPM is a device that ‘listens’ for PPM encoded radio and television programs, or anything with a sound channel. When worn around, the PPM can identify and measure all the ads and programs that a test subject was exposed to during the course of the day.

Like Microsoft’s Natasha Hrizuk, Huang spoke about the powerful effects of combining multiple mediums when running an ad campaign– in this case, when combing radio and television. The PPM is able to track the same person’s exposure to all ‘encoded’ audio throughout the day.

The more accurate a measurement is, the more confidently Arbitron can answer the question “what real value did I get from spending my money on ‘X’?’

Currently, Arbitron and CIMM are working together on gathering data from a panel of subjects that will measure exposure to TV, internet, and mobile advertising.

Looking into the future, Huang revealed that Arbitron is very interested in measuring and gathering data from podcast listeners.

Globalization of Brands from a Social Media Perspective

UM has been monitoring the globalization of brands form a social media perspective, and Graeme Hutton spoke to us about it.


The above video interview is from the Advertising Research Foundation Audience Measurement conference.

Sponsored by

advertising research, brands, webtv, webisodic series, online video, consumers, eyeballs, display advertising, ana, association of national advertisers, iab, 4as

Graeme Hutton of Universal McCann gave us a rundown of all the data they have been collecting on social media and the influence it has on advertising and marketing.

UM has been monitoring the globalization of brands from a social media perspective. They have a global tracker of over 35,000 people from over 50 countries on watch. Hutton made the point that social media is not only about social networks but also includes blogs, photo sharing sites, and video sharing sites.

They found that as social media grew, people’s visits to company websites actually decreased. Consumer interaction with social network fan pages increased dramatically. More and more people are sharing branded content online. Hutton pointed out a big difference between sharing branded content online verses the word of mouth is that when people mention a brand through the word of mouth, people are very casual about it, and it’s often brought up to keep a conversation going. Sharing through social media, on the other hand, tends to have more of a purpose because it’s more of a representation of a person’s online personality. It makes sense because if you share something online it’s archived, and in some way, it’s more permanent than a mention in real life.

Some other points Hutton made include:
-The effectiveness of integrating two mediums into the same campaign. (ex. twitter and television for Superbowl)
-Consumers making and sharing their own content
-Virality of popular branded content
-Frequency caps for ads
and more data associated with social media

Non-advertising Research Execs Discuss Research Needs

Michael Pardee recaps the panel he moderated called ‘Non Research Execs Discuss Research Needs’ from the ARF Conference.


The above video interview is from the Advertising Research Foundation Audience Measurement conference.

Sponsored by

advertising research, brands, webtv, webisodic series, online video, consumers, eyeballs, display advertising, ana, association of national advertisers, iab, 4as

Michael Pardee, SVP of Research at Scripps Networks, gave a great overview of the panel he moderated at the ARF Audience Measurement Conference. The panel was named ‘Non Research Execs Discuss Research Needs’ and it included Scripps Networks, Association of National Advertisers, Time Inc. Branded Solutions, GroupM and Optimedia US. The panel focused on the challenges they face in the next few years. Many of the panelists had similar concerns.

One of the main concerns across the board is that there are a lot of fragmented ways to measure all the different digital platforms, and that leads to the question, “Are we measuring what we think we are measuring?”

Pardee uses the DVR as an example of a device not currently captured but one that definitely has an impact on audience engagement and advertising. When the industry figures out the best way to capture DVR data, brands might want to use commercial breaks differently by changing the timing of those ads.

For more of Michael Pardee’s recap of the ARF Panel, please view the above video.

Keeping Consumers from Hitting the Mute Button

How can content marketing engage consumers when they are in control of their media? Interview with John McCarus, from The Third Act unit of Digitas.


The above video interview is from Internet Week in NYC.

Sponsored by
brands, webtv, webisodic series, content marketing, consumers, eyeballs, display advertising, ana, association of national advertisers, iab, 4as

“If you’re a brand, are you going to police or release? Are you going to control or participate?”

John McCarus, SVP, Group Director, Brand Content for The Third Act unit of Digitas, acknowledges that the correct answers are more easily said than done. “Organizations can take a long time to saddle up from legal and cultural standpoints to the real opportunity,” he observes. Yet he does see clients who are addressing this issue starting to see some real success.

Brands, according to McCarus, are being driven to the gates of publishing. They should be thinking about a content strategy encompassing entertainment, information and utility that reaches across paid, owned and earned channels to offer value to consumers where they are.

McCarus suggests that a brand can no more go to Facebook intending to aggregate a big audience without content, than one would invite people over for a big dinner party without a menu.

The Creative Agency as Business Consultant

John Baker of JWT discusses the challenges presented to creative agencies by new digital advertising paradigms.

The above video interview is from Internet Week in NYC.

Sponsored by

brands, webtv, webisodic series, content marketing, consumers, eyeballs, display advertising, ana, association of national advertisers, iab, 4as

“It’s less about the channel and more about ideas that solve business problems,” says John Baker, President of Client Services, JWT New York. More than just coming up with great creative, Baker sees his agency in a consultative role, assisting with media selection, how different media will play off each other in the ecosystem, how social will be used and additional, important decisions.

Baker speaks about having success by going beyond messages that a particular product is a better choice than those offered by competing brands to answering consumers’ questions about which is a better company. Citing work with Microsoft and T. Rowe Price in this interview, he describes using brand journalism to communicate thought leadership through timeliness, relevancy, content value and peer participation/influence.

As the industry works towards shorter development cycles and multiplatform “content events,” the process can get guidance from brand metrics — such as those for video that allow measurement down to individual units on individual channels. Development, creation and deployment, though, include new challenges. For example, these initiatives carry the additional cost and time burdens of the involvement of a greater number of people — from inside the brand, inside the agency, other agencies and media and technical partners.

Addressing interactive video in particular, Baker sees a need for deeper collaboration between agencies, as well as greater commitment by agencies to make this engagement technique more widely used. Without an example that leaps to mind among industry insiders, much less consumers, he is open about needing, “A huge idea that shows the world what we can do with branching or interactive video. Whether we or someone else does it, we’ll all be better for it.”